Physics might have helped

Topics not fitting anywhere else.
Din
Posts: 226
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2015 4:47 pm

Physics might have helped

Post by Din » Tue Apr 12, 2016 1:05 pm

A bit of a fiasco, evidently, in understanding holograms and MIL specs

http://soldiersystems.net/2015/11/24/us ... ch-sights/

Ed Wesly
Posts: 498
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2015 2:16 pm

Re: Physics might have helped

Post by Ed Wesly » Wed Apr 13, 2016 7:12 am

What do you expect, they were using SHSG holos.
"We're the flowers in the dustbin" Sex Pistols

Din
Posts: 226
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2015 4:47 pm

Re: Physics might have helped

Post by Din » Wed Apr 13, 2016 1:54 pm

Exactly! It should have occurred to someone, some tech people who I hope they have there, that simple physics would show that gelatin cannot withstand -55 C to 125 C (MIL spec for military devices). Hence my point that simple physics should have told them that gelatin would either crack or become goop at these extremes. When I first heard about this at ISDH 2012, I wondered how they could pass MIL specs. My only explanations are that either this job was sold by marketing people who didn't understand MIL specs, or the tech people simply tested it in the lab and assumed it would work in the field of a military operation, or they were aware it couldn't pass the temp conditions but hoped that military wouldn't test it to these extremes. Reading the article, it seems that the basis of the lawsuit is that they knew it wouldn't pass MIL specs, but didn't say anything.

Also wonder why SHSG. Why not just dcg to start with. I can understand that a laser for dcg is expensive, or the exposure is long, for the hobbyist. But, if they can throw 10 mil to settle a lawsuit, surely they can buy a Verdi?

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